Monday, 10 May 2010

A sweet bird

There are some wonderful wild hedgerows around here along footpaths and tracks. Thick, high, rich in their variety as Nature will do if left space to on work her own. Blossom on the wild cherry, which has been radiant this year, has more or less finished and the fruit is beginning to form. This weekend the hedgerows were brightened by the humble crab apple. Bright with the large blossom the tiny leaves are hardly noticeable. Passing these trees the hum was perceptible with all senses except sight. Approaching one of these resplendent bushes I saw a small bird about the size of a great tit leaving one of the wide open flowers. Had it been feeding on the nectar? I have never seen or heard of birds doing this apart from humming birds with their long beaks for this purpose. As I said the flowers were wide open so maybe the prize was easier to obtain. Can anyone throw some light on this?

4 comments:

  1. Tramp…if I were guessing (which I am) I'd say the birds were feeding on insects feeding on the nectar.

    FYI, there are birds other than hummingbirds which feed on nectar, though they're mostly tropical species. However, I don't know anything about what you have in your part of the world, so there might be a nectar-feeding bird there, too. Also, some birds at least occasionally feed on tree sap.

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  2. Griz
    That's very feasible.
    I didn't get a good enough look to see exactly what it was doing, I couldn't even identify which bird it was - I stated its likeness to a great tit because they are a common hedgerow bird here and so with what detail I saw that was a good bet. However it did appear to go right into the flower after something.
    Thanks
    Tramp

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  3. I wonder what it was? I'd be surprised if it was feeding on nectar but wouldn't be certain that it wasn't - tho' I have always thought of nectar feeding as tropical or at least a bit warmer. Julie

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  4. Julie
    There you are. I thought you'd disappeared. Maybe Griz (above) has the answer.
    ...Tramp

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